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A short introduction to Swedish literature

It is said that the best way to get to know a country is to read its literature. Actually, that is not a saying yet, but it should be one! Because what can be more informative than what a nation’s finest have put in print? When asked what Swedish books they know, many people will probably only come up with ...

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Science snippets

Story by: Joanna Kritikou Remember the ice bucket challenge? It actually directly funded a major breakthrough in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) research. Whole-exome analyses of 1,022 familial ALS (FALS) cases and 7,315 controls were conducted, making it the largest ever study of genetically inherited ALS. Researchers identified a significant association between loss-of-function NEK1 variants and FALS risk. Even though NEK1 ...

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The Glasgow effect: the power of vulnerability

Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland – the cultural hub of the country. Emerging from the 20th century, and characterised by heavy industry, the city now also hosts an exciting music, arts and nightlife scene, drawing from its rich and deep-rooted traditions. But the city has a darker side – a mystery that has plagued epidemiologists for a number of years. ...

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From footnote to headline: A yellow fever outbreak.

Out of sight, out of mind. That’s the painful lesson yellow fever has taught us. Story by: Devy Elling In December 2015, a case of yellow fever in Luanda, Angola was detected. This was the first case that birthed a full blown outbreak in Angola and its neighbouring countries. Distant countries like China have also reported cases of yellow fever ...

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Cultivation theory: How media shapes our worldview

Something nice and sweet trends on social media… a commenter types – “faith in humanity restored”. Many others rush to like the comment. Something tragic takes place, many people die… the onlookers read the news and sigh “what has this world come to…” Many others react by changing their social media profile picture. Story by: Zach Chia The Cultivation Theory, ...

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Ballet for beginners: A review of Misommarnattsdröm at Kungliga operan

Despite coming from the land that gave us Billy Elliot, I’ve never really been interested in the ballet. However, living in Stockholm and having the Kungliga Operan showing Midsommarnattsdröm on my doorstep, how could I resist attending my very first ballet performance? Story by: Ben Libberton My friends and I arrived just in time which actually means, we arrived a ...

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Part 3 of 3. Just about anything can happen.

Story by: Elin Doyle On the side of a valley in North-Eastern Nepal, just south of Mount Everest, lies a small rural community hospital. The surrounds of the hospital are adorned by scattered settlements and terrace cultivation. In the 1960s, a former surgeon in the Scottish army started a health project here, perhaps it was the mountainous ranges that reminded ...

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Part 2 of 3. No, we probably don’t see this in Sweden

Story by: Elin Doyle Universal health care is helpful in ensuring a minimum level of health treatment for all. In 2008, the Nepali Government implemented a “Free Health Program”, which provides free essential health care services at all health posts nationwide. This is provided to all citizens, irrespective of their economic status. Furthermore, 38 essential drugs (such as paracetamol and ...

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A Silicon future. New startups aim to connect brain and machine.

The Wall Street Journal reported last March that Elon Musk is backing up a neuroscience tech called Neuralink that has the modest aim to enhance the human brain by connecting it to a computer. The Silicon Valley billionaire and CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, has been discussing the “neural lace” concept since 2016 as means to make humans keep pace ...

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Part 1 of 3. Literacy, the ABCs to reclaiming what is rightfully theirs.

Story by: Elin Doyle It was early in the morning when we took off. Winding along serpentine roads with rocky precipices running hundreds of meters down next to us made this road one of the roughest and bumpiest journeys I’ve ever travelled in my life. There were women in red, green, and yellow slowly carrying huge packs of leafy grass ...

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